8 Reasons To Say No To Medicaid Expansion

8 Reasons to Say No to Medicaid Expansion

As part of the president’s health care plan (“ObamaCare”) states are being encouraged to expand Medicaid to cover able-bodied adults who earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL). Medicaid already covers low-income mothers and children, as well as disabled adults and low-income seniors. Expanding Medicaid will cover adults with no children who are working or could be working — at least some of whom already have private insurance coverage. In addition to being unnecessary, the expansion will result in lower quality care for Medicaid patients, higher taxes and debt, and job losses for the country as a whole.

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Charter School Q & A

Charter School Q & A

Answers to Your Questions About Charter Schools

Q. Why do parents and children in “Successful” districts need public charter schools?

A. For the same reasons parents and children in any district might want a public charter school. Charter schools are not like antibiotics that should be given only to sick children; they are more like a dose of Vitamin C.

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Health Insurance Terms Defined

Glossary of Insurance Terms

Adverse Selection: The tendency for people with greater needs to be more likely to sign up for insurance, or to enroll in one plan over another, resulting in a health insurance pool containing a disproportionate share of people with medical conditions. Such a situation leads to higher premiums, which will drive healthier people out of the pool.

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Seven Principles of Sound Public Policy

by Lawrence W. Reed

The Seven Principles of Sound Public Policy was presented by Lawrence (Larry) Reed on February 17, 2003 at the Mississippi Family Council (now Mississippi Center for Public Policy) annual banquet. Permission was granted by Lawrence Reed and the Mackinac Center to publish the speech. Similar permission should be obtained before republishing this document. To limit confusion, any references made to Mississippi Family Council have been changed to Mississippi Center for Public Policy.

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